Bay Area Satsuki Aikokai

Satsuki Azalea Bonsai Club

Category: Bonsai Display

Bay Area Satsuki Aikokai (BASA) 22nd Annual Show

On 20 and 21 May 2017, at Lakeside Park Garden Center, Oakland, California, the Bay Area Satsuki Aikokai (BASA) held their 22nd Annual Satsuki Azalea Bonsai Show. Featuring Satsuki Azalea bonsai in full bloom. There were vendor and member sales, including imported from Japan Satsuki Azalea bonsai. Silent auctions and expert advise on hand made the show more exciting and informational. This year’s theme was “It’s all about the flowers in May.” Here are some photographs of the show bonsai.

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Satsuki Azalea Bonsai at 8th World Bonsai Convention

I attended the 8th World Bonsai Convention (WBC), April 27-30, 2017, at Saitama City, Japan. The exhibition and vendor Satsuki Azalea Bonsai were beautiful. Here are some photos of the exhibit and vendor trees. Excursions included the Omiya Bonsai Village, Omiya Bonsai Art Museum, and the Musashi Ichinomiya Hikawa Shrine. Something about the WBC. It’s held every four years. The 1st WBC was held in Japan 28 years ago. The next World Bonsai Convention will take place in the City of Perth, Australia in 2021.

Bonsai Display by Jonas Dupuich

BONSAI DISPLAY BY JONAS DUPUICH

Our Bay Area Satsuki Azalea club meeting at the Lake Merritt Garden Center in Oakland, on March 23, 2017 was especially interesting and well-attended. The guest speaker was Jonas Dupuich, who brought along a variety of trees and display stands and an extensive knowledge of the often subtle but decisive art of display. Jonas, a founding member of BASA, began his presentation by discussing the different ways azaleas are shown: as purely flower displays, as bonsai with or without some flowers, and as deciduous bare trees so that the development of the structure is paramount. He also provided an excellent handout itemizing how to prepare our trees for exhibit – many reminders that all of us can use at show time.

 The interactive presentation began with a discussion of the display stands which ranged from formal to informal, from light colored finishes to darker ones, and from tall or short to flat trays. Jonas explained the uses and placement of these and the other elements of a display, such as secondary trees, accent plants, and scrolls to create a harmonious presentation. Members of the club were called on to express opinions and preferences, and then the somewhat loose set of rules and conventions that govern the art of display were applied to the results to demonstrate how to optimize the final result.

It was of interest to note that many of the “rules” seemed to be principles that a person with an education in design, or one of great sensitivity and some experience, would probably choose to follow automatically. For example, large, strong trees were shown to look their best in the formal style of presentation: larger stands of darker finish, rectangular rather than square shapes, straighter lines, simpler design and uncomplicated appearance. Of course, the opposite was demonstrated to be true as well: more delicate trees looked best on stands of lighter colors, curved legs, oval or round or more square shapes.

 Once a tree was properly set, Jonas added accent plants and scrolls that harmonized in color, size and tone, and that accurately suggested the season and geographical area that the artist wished to depict.

 The presentation by Jonas was informative and well-paced, with handouts to read and plenty of trees and stands to demonstrate, and he also used the trees and pots and ideas that members brought in the process. This high quality of presentation and thorough approach can always be expected from him, and it was a pleasure to participate.

– Chris Ross

 

Stone bonsai stands

Stone Bonsai StandsI recently purchased two lime stone pieces from American Soil and Stone, Richmond, CA. I got tired of wood bonsai stands and fighting wood rot and termites. I wanted something different in the way of bonsai stands in the landscape.

Stone Bonsai Stands

The two lime stones were cut but are odd pieces in that they show some raw sections of the original stone. I believe they look artistic. In any case, I got a price deal because the stones were not perfectly squared off. I paid $150 each, plus $210 and tax to deliver the stones to my driveway in Petaluma. I had to figure a way to lift and move the stones from the driveway to the landscape. With a good dolly having new tires and the help from a solid friend, we muscled the stones into place. I then topped the stones with bonsai from my collection.

I think the stones make great alternative bonsai stands and add an artistic touch to the overall landscape.

George Haas

Stone Bonsai Stands